Why Probiotics can Boost Male Fertility

Why Probiotics can Boost Male Fertility?

Trying to conceive a child doesn’t always come easy but there are ways to boost your fertility and increase your chances without needing to take medication. Probiotics are not commonly recommended yet by doctors however, research does suggest they can boost male fertility rates by support sperm health.

What are Probiotics?

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts usually described as “good bacteria” that offer us health benefits. Our digestive system is home to good bacteria that help us digest food, fight bad bacteria by supporting our immune system and be generally healthy. If these bacteria levels are harmed, we can become ill and have other side effects.

There is evidence suggesting that taking additional probiotics can be a treatment for various conditions. Research has shown they’ve worked well to treat different digestion conditions and other related problems.

Is there research support Probiotics boosting Male Fertility?

Studies are still a little low but the ones we have are all confirming the same thing. Probiotics do improve various factors that affect the male fertility rate.

One study compared two antioxidant probiotic strains (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28343402/) and their effects on sperm quality in those with reduced sperm motility. The study was focused on men who are asthenozoospermic, three weeks and then six weeks after being administered the probiotics. This one discovered that the probiotics did improve motility and decreased DNA fragmentation which further improved the sperm quality.

Back in 2016, a different group of researchers looked into probiotics, diet-induced obesity and general “mechanical sensitivity” (https://www.hindawi.com/journals/prm/2016/5080438/). The study did easements every two weeks via an electronic device to access them and measure the results. It was revealed that the probiotics used in the study improved overall sperm quality and boosted sperm concentration too.

A different study looked at infertile men with bad bacteria in their sperm (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4215667/) and a potential treatment option. They were given antibiotics and a probiotic which killed the bad bacteria and reduced the chance of another outbreak. Researchers were able to conclude that this combination may be able to prevent further sperm quality reduction and preserve fertility.

What does it all mean?

It means there is clear evidence that probiotics are a treatment tool for infertility and to prevent it from becoming worse. More research is still needed of course but it’s a very promising start. We should see doctors being more willing to recommend probiotics to patients within the next few years.

Can Probiotics help Women too?

There is  evidence that probiotics can help boost female fertility rates too. An investigative study into the correlation between fertility and probiotics (https://mefj.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s43043-020-00039-y) discovered that they can have a restoration effect. They can boost the vaginal microbiome which then improves fertility rates and the chance of conception. After looking at many studies, they noted that the findings were verified by looking at cell and tissue samples of female reproductive organs.

Various studies have focused on female fertility as well including some looking at vaginal microbia and fertility (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7146451/). They note that while there are different causes of fertility loss, probiotics do support and preserve fertility for both males and females.

Does this mean we both need to take Probiotics?

Probiotics have a positive effect on fertility for anyone trying to conceive. It will help to increase your chances of success and probiotics have other benefits too. More research is still needed into this to see what bacteria’s are best since this could depend on other situations. Other research suggests that obesity influences your good bacteria levels (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18178190/) and musculoskeletal pain (https://www.hindawi.com/journals/prm/2017/4628627/) might as well.

As a bonus, we know that the vaginal microbiome is important during a vaginal delivery since they have a big influence on the baby’s gut biome too. In addition to this, a healthy microbiome will reduce the risk of pregnancy complications and preterm delivery rates (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1472648317301876).

 

 

 

 

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